Category: Open Data

Invisible Open Data

On the Internet, there is the concept of the Deep Web – “large parts of the web that is not reachable by search engines.”  By one estimate, 80% of the information on the web is “invisible.” On the Open Data front, I submit that a lot of government data is also “invisible”, with a large majority of it locked up behind custom search engines with …

READ MORE

PediaCities: Making Smarter Communities through Civic Te...

PediaCities is super proud of its recent civic tech collaboration with the New York City Department of Education’s iZone, in which we helped the iZone tackle the challenge of high school choice.  We were also very proud to have been chosen as one of the civic tech leaders featured in a recent panel discussion at the Talking Transition Tent. Photo by n0n3ck Yesterday, our product …

READ MORE

PediaCities Testifies at New York City Council Hearing a...

PediaCities, as an open-data company, was happy to join others from the civic hacking community in New York City to testify at a city council hearing about DoITT’s administration of the New York City Open Data Law.   Our product manager, Nathan Storey, delivered the following testimony at a the hearing this afternoon: Testimony in support of T2013-7110 Honorable Chairperson, I am Nathan Storey, Product Manager …

READ MORE

Watch PediaCities co-founder Joel Natividad on BBC

PediaCities is “doing big data for good, for regular people,” says our co-founder Joel Natividad in a recent video interview with the BBC’s Jonny Dymond. The BBC piece explores how big data and NYC’s open data protocols are changing the way the city functions. Dymond observes that New York City is “gathering data, processing data, and distributing data like never before, tearing down the walls …

READ MORE

Did You Catch the PediaCities audio interview on BBC?

In case you missed it, PediaCities co-founder Joel Natividad was recently interviewed by the BBC. In a short piece about the enormous volume of raw data that has become public in the wake of New York’s sweeping open data laws, BBC correspondent Jonny Dymond spoke with Joel about the innovative way that PediaCities helps to make that data actionable for NYC’s citizens.  Dymond touches on …

READ MORE

The Why and How of Our Neighborhoods Map

Curious about why we wanted to make a neighborhood-based map to explore NYC’s data?  Curious about how we made the map you’ve been clicking around? Read on to find out! We wanted to present our robust data in a neighborhood by neighborhood fashion because we know how meaningful neighborhoods are for many people.  Unlike cities, or election districts, or census blocks, however, neighborhoods do not …

READ MORE

Our take on Open Source and Our Government

Fred Wilson wrote a great post yesterday about Open Source and Our Government.  Our take was buried in the very active “disqus”sion afterwards, so I’d thought I’d post it here and expand on it further: Source Code is Data. So it can even be argued that Open Source falls under the Federal Open Data initiative.   For a civic tech startup like us, its so …

READ MORE

Presenting a New Way to Get to Know Your Neighborhood

PediaCities is quite proud to introduce our spiffy new neighborhoods map. We think this map will help people navigate the vast array of NYC data that’s becoming publicly available under the new open data laws. We love that this map helps people find an informative selection of open data that comes from a variety of agencies and organization. But what’s even more exciting to us …

READ MORE

Find Out More About Your Neighborhood Grocery Store

Ever wonder if that fish market around the corner is a safe place to buy a fillet or two, or if it’s really true that your neighborhood has no clean grocery stores?  Lucky for you, PediaCities has created an easy to use, interactive grocery store finder to help you do just that. You can enter an address to see the health inspection results of nearby …

READ MORE

#opendata shutdown: The Case for a Web of Data

Federal open data portals have gone dark because of the shutdown.  Census.gov, data.gov, and countless other sites are unavailable.  Thankfully, the opendata community  stepped up and have quickly cobbled together workarounds to keep the data flowing. We’re still just a few days into the shutdown so its full impact is yet to be felt as the our politicians play “essential services” poker and the “Anti-Deficiency …

READ MORE